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Category: HMCS Summerside

Blast from the Past: 1/72 HMCS Summerside MM711 (Part 2)

So, back in 2011 I posted a build log of my then current ship model project–a 1/72 scale HMCS Summerside model–on the ModelWarships.com forum.  Just recently I stumbled across those postings and thought it would be an easy way of generating more blog content if I copied it over here as well (for posterity sake or something).  This is Part 2; Part 1 can be found here.

The original can be found here: http://www.shipmodels.info/mws_forum/viewtopic.php?f=13&t=72158 .

Just to riff on what’s already been said regarding errors, it really does test, and push your modeling skills to the edge taking on a project like this. Throughout the process I’ve been sharing the build with friends and members of one of the local hobby clubs, and sometimes it was hard to take the criticism–I had a vision of what I wanted, and I could see that even when all anyone else could see was a collection of badly-glued wood pieces. The constructive criticism though was of great value, and so long as you take some of it with a grain of salt, have faith in your vision and your skills, and then make the needed modifications I believe the build will be a success. Having worked my way through this project, I’m very proud to be able to call myself a modeller, rather than just a kit-builder

[…] I’d forgotten there was another shape issue with one of the bulkheads–I have no idea how or why, but one of the bulkheads ended up too wide at the top, causing a weird undulation amidships. I re-profiled it, cut new stringers, added a new bulkhead in-between to smooth out the profile and prayed to the gods of wood putty and sand-paper that I could make it smooth later

The following two photos show Summerside after the work on the bow and amidships:

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At this point, once I’d reshaped the amidships bulge, added a 1″ plug just forward of where the Bofors would mount and re-shaped the bow block with generous helping of wood putty, I sanded the living hell out of it and sealed the wood with several coats of acrylic varnish.

I initially planned on coating the wood with a thin layer of Bondo, but my good friend Dennis Kaye (an amazing ship-modeler in his own right, and someone who has been like a mentor to me on this project) suggested I use lithoplate. In an attempt to replicate the actual hull plating, I marked up the hull with panel lines and numbers indication what plate goes where–hence the weird look of the hull.

As can be seen in this photo as well:
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I’ve planked the deck the same was as the hull, and overlaid thin styrene sheet, using Bondo to fill the seams. The superstructure, mast, fun mount and stacks are under construction, but the bridge is only mocked up with cardboard–I’d hoped to get the shape right using cardboard for a master before cutting clear acrylic sheets for the bridge deck bulkheads, but that didn’t go quite as expected…

Here is a similar shot after the litho was glued, a skim coat of Bondo applied and the whole hull sanded down and primed:
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The stacks have been sheeted with styrene, and I’ve replicated the dished, stressed-metal effect common to Kingston-Class stacks, by drawing a curved scalpel across the sheet in parallel and perpendicular lines. The effect came out a little overdone, so as construction continued I mellowed it out using some Mr Surfacer and my good friend sand-paper

Another shot, from the bow this time. Still some sanding left to do:
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The hawse-pipes were drilled out and brass tube fitted. I’m using a Billing’s Boat winch, but it’s being modified as it’s not exactly the same as what Summerside has. I still have the cardboard bridge as I was still having trouble getting the angled-outwards part of the bridge right. These photos were taken by my Dad who was out in Calgary visiting. He was heading back to PEI the end of May 2010 (around when these photos were taken) and wanted to approach the Charlottetown Naval reserve, HMCS Queen Charlotte, about the possibility of me donating the completed model to them–lord knows I don’t have room in my house to display it properly. Being an architect, my father wanted some good scale photos to take to the Queen Charlotte.

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So this was the state of proceedings last May when I took her to the Western Canadian Regional Model Contest in Nanton Alberta. There was still a lot of work to do, but I was happy with how it was coming–especially in light of being able to–in my mind successfully–deal with the shape issues I’d run in to. It was becoming to look like the ship in my vision–even if only I could see that.

Cheers,

Sean

Blast from the Past: 1/72 HMCS Summerside MM711

So, back in 2011 I posted a build log of my then current ship model project–a 1/72 scale HMCS Summerside model–on the ModelWarships.com forum.  Just recently I stumbled across those postings and thought it would be an easy way of generating more blog content if I copied it over here as well (for posterity sake or something).  The original can be found here: http://www.shipmodels.info/mws_forum/viewtopic.php?f=13&t=72158 .

1/72 HMCS Summerside MM 711

first posted Tuesday, March 1, 2011.

Some background: I hail from Prince Edward Island, Canada’s smallest province, but one with a proud military tradition. I’m defiantly a 1/72 modeler, choosing this scale over almost all others, and when 2010 rolled around I knew I wanted to build a 1/72 model of a Canadian warship, as my celebration of the Canadian Navy’s centennial. Never having tackled anything that big before, I figured I’d cover my bases by getting several sets of plans for modern Canadian ships–and eventually I settled on the smaller Kingston-class MCDV; partly because it was do-able, and partly because one of the MCDVs is named after PEI’s second largest city, Summerside. I’ve since fallen in love with ship modeling, and have plans on building all the ships that have served in the Canadian navy that were named after places on PEI (there are seven, and in 1/72 I may need a larger house…)

I have a debt of gratitude especially to Darren Scannell of the Resin Shipyard, as without his assistance and patience with my stupid questions about ships this project wouldn’t have been started, let alone nearing completion. As well, I thank several other board members who have helped answer questions or offer advice–and not to mention the amazing reference materials that exist here as the completed builds of a variety of ship models large and small. This board is home to some master craftsmen, and I aspire to that level of quality myself one day.

One further note: This was a Navy Centennial build, and should have been completed last year, but a kink in the form of a broken ankle in December conspired to delay it. Nonetheless, when I started, I’d not considered posting the build, so some of the early photos are taken with my Blackberry, and are of dubious quality.

So here we go…way back in January of 2010…

Here’s where everything started, the keel laying (as it were):
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After cutting the bulkheads and gluing them to the keel, I set out to run stringers (none of them apparently straight) between. Some scrap balsa was fiddled with to produce a rough 1/700 Summerside mock-up–just for fun
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The bow, and stern were carved from balsa, and once I was reasonably happy with the stringers (which is to say, they were all glued in place) I started planking using 1/16 balsa strip–pinning it using straight pins to hold it while the carpenter’s glue dried:
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It was at this point that I was unsure of the shape of the bow–the whole ship seems short and squatter than is should be….unfortunately, I’d started building before I had a top view scaled to 1/72…this would cause problems later…
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It looked nice by the stern though 🙂
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A fuzzy shot of the planked hull…
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Compare that to the real Summerside:
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Yeah, shape issues. Once I got a decent main deck plan view scaled to 1/72 I realized what happened–when re-scaling the plans I had, I’d assumed they were all the same scale–but the starboard elevation (visible in the first photo under the keel) was slightly smaller. Without a gut check with the main deck plan, I’d ended up using the wrong measurements, and that screwed up the shape of the bow. At this point, I had to cut the bow off, add a 1″ plug of balsa to bring it to the right length, and re-profile everything….

More on that my next post.

Thanks for listening to my rambling.

Cheers,

Sean

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